Colorado

October 13, 2018

At Arapahoe Community College – Littleton Campus

Sessions:

  • An 1830s Fur Trader converses about the Plains Indian Trade by Michael Schaubs 
  • The Christmas Day Battle for Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge by Don Cygan
  • Skiing Off to War by Thomas Duhs
  • Imagineering with Walt Disney by David Skipper
  • The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla by Tom Keller 
  • Finding Lost Railway Stations and Equipment by Jim Jordan 
  • Colorado Genealogy Research by Lori Collins 
  • Exonerating General George Custer: Separating Fact from Political Bias by George Koukeas 
  • Colorado Inventors by Doug Cohn 
  • What Really Happened to Titanic? by Phill Kleppen and Janet Kalstrom
  • Stories learned from Signature and Friendship Quilts by Scotti McCarthy
  • Frontier Marshal Mart Duggan Ruled Rowdy Leadville with an Iron Fist by Gail Lindley
  • Colorado’s Mining Booms & Busts: 150 Years of Roller Coaster History by Stephen Hart 
  • November ’42, Watershed of the Century by Stan Moore
  • Who Was the Sculptor in Buckskin? Alexander Phimister Proctor! by Dave Lively 
  • Iron, Dynamite and Intrigue by Stan Moore
  • Lasting Legacy of Western Women-Part 2 by Jamie Melissa Wilms
  • Historic Preservation and Colorado’s Most Endangered Places Program by Kim Grant 
  • Using Digital History Tools to Understand the History of Obscure Plants by Timothy Vilgiate
  • Stories Learned from Signature and Friendship Quilts by Scotti McCarthy
  • A Vice for All: The Seedy Side of Denver by Savannah Reeves & Heather Pressman
  • The White Plague: How Tuberculosis Shaped Colorado by Jenifer Fisher
  • “Give the Women A Chance”: the 125th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage in Colorado by Megan Moriarty
  • The Vitality of Volunteers in Preserving Yesterday’s Buildings for Tomorrow by Hameed Alnassar
  • Meriwether Lewis’s Survey at Cumberland Gap: or What’s up with the 36-30 Line of North Latitude between Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee? by Lorna Hainesworth
  • The History of Denver’s Celebrity Sports Center: Thirty-five Years of Fun and Entertainment by David Forsyth

 

Read descriptions for each session here

Join our mailing list here to stay up to date and be the first to know when registration opens.

 

Presenting

If you are interested in presenting and haven’t been to History Camp before, there are important ways in which being a part of History Camp is different than being a speaker at a conference.  It comes down to this: We’re all in this together, which means, among other things . . .

• Everyone comes at the beginning and stays until the end. Speakers do not just come for their session and leave.

• No one is paid. This is an all-volunteer effort designed to break even.

• You are your own A/V tech. Just arrive early if you are doing the first session so you have plenty of time to set up, and stay until the next person comes so you can help them.

• Everyone pays. There is no formal organization behind History Camp. Your payment, along with those from everyone else, means that the organizers don’t have to dig in to their own pockets to make up the shortfall.

• Everyone shares. If you have slides, we’ll help you post them to the History Camp site. We may also videotape or stream your presentation live (such as on Facebook) so that people who can’t attend can benefit from History Camp.

If History Camp sounds like its for you, please fill out this form. Browse prior years to read about other presentations as well as the different formats that have been used. If you have questions, please let me know.

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