Supporting History Camp

Did you know?

  • Only one third of Americans can pass a citizenship test.[1]
  • Americans on the whole have trouble identifying historical figures and events correctly, such as who General Dwight D Eisenhower was, or which states were the original 13 colonies.[2]
  • Social Studies as a whole were relegated to second tier status when No Child Left Behind legislation was enacted. That means schools spend more time, money and effort on teaching subjects which are heavily tested, leaving history in the wake.[3]
  • Decline in civics education links to the decline in civic participation.[4]
  • Enrollment in history is down at colleges across the nation but especially at the graduate level.[5]

How does History Camp help?

History Camp makes history interesting and accessible to all adults.  We believe it is important to have a place where people can come together to learn and immerse in history without needing fancy credentials or other prohibitive or exclusive requirements. History Camp sparks interest in history which leads to additional learning and eventually more active participation in civics.

 

To support an existing History Camp, contact the person or persons who organize the History Camp in that city, region, or state. Links to contact information appear under each History Camp page on this site.

If you’re interested expanding History Camp to new cities and making more History Camp content available to more people, contact Lee Wright, founder of History Camp.

 


[1] Riccards, Patrick. “National Survey Finds Just 1 in 3 Americans Would Pass Citizenship Test.” Woodrow.org.  https://woodrow.org/news/national-survey-finds-just-1-in-3-americans-would-pass-citizenship-test/ (accessed November 21, 2018).
[2] Ibid.
[3] Hansen, Michael, and Elizabeth Mann Levesque, Jon Valant, and Diana Quintero. “The 2018 Brown Center Report on American Education.” Brookings.edu. https://www.brookings.edu/multi-chapter-report/the-2018-brown-center-report-on-american-education/ (accessed November 21, 2018).
[4] Ibid.
[5] Brookins, Julia. “Enrollment Continues to Decline: AHA Survey Again Shows Fewer Undergraduates in History Courses.” Historians.org. https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/february-2018/enrollment-declines-continue-aha-survey-again-shows-fewer-undergraduates-in-history-courses (accessed November 21, 2018). And Schmidt, Benjamin. “The Humanities Are in Crisis.” TheAtlantic.com. https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/08/the-humanities-face-a-crisisof-confidence/567565/ (accessed November 21, 2018).