Colorado

October 13, 2018

At Arapahoe Community College – Littleton Campus

Sessions:

 

An 1830s Fur Trader converses about the Plains Indian Trade

By Michael Schaubs, First Person Interpreter, author, retired geologist

This program will be given as a first person interpretation in the character of an 1840 Bent & St. Vrain Co. fur trader. Bent’s Fort was a fur trading post which existed from 1835 till 1849 in an area that would become SE Colorado. The fort’s primary customers were the Plains Indians of the region though travelers on the Santa Fe Trail were also frequent customers. Depending on interest, topics covered may include: the position of the trader in fur trade society, merchandise for trading, Indians as sophisticated consumers, the currency of the trade, prairie transportation, customs and procedures of the trade, designation and use of Indian “soldiers,” communications, and the use of alcohol.

 

The Christmas Day Battle for Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge

By Don Cygan, Historian, Author, Professor

As the Battle of the Bulge raged, a small force of American solders—including the famed 101st Airborne division, tank destroyer crews, engineers, and artillerymen—was completely surrounded by Hitler’s armies in the Belgian town of Bastogne. Taking the town was imperative to Hitler’s desperate plan to drive back the Allies and turn the tide of the war. The attack would come just before dawn.

As the outnumbered, undersupplied Americans gathered in church for services or shivered in their snow-covered foxholes on the fringes of the front lines, freshly reinforced German forces of men and tanks attacked. The battle was up close and personal, with the cold, exhausted soldiers of both armies fighting for every square foot of frozen earth.

 

Skiing Off to War

By Thomas Duhs, Author, Retired Marine

The 10th Mountain Division trained at Camp Hale, near Leadville Colorado from Nov 1942 to June 1944. The only mountain division was unique in how the men were recruited, trained, and employed in Italy to end the war in May 1945. After the war these troops had an effect on skiing as well.

 

Imagineering with Walt Disney

By David Skipper, Chautauqua scholar and actor

“It’s Anything Can Happen Day,” when Disney scholar and actor David Skipper brings Walt Disney magically to life. Walt reminisces about his childhood influences, the animation and motion picture business, building Disneyland and his innovations in urban development for an Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow (EPCOT). Walt brings some artifacts from the Disney Archives to display and he mayjust talk about his greatest film achievement “Mary Poppins.”

 

Finding Lost Railway Stations and Equipment

By Jim Jordan, President of Rocky Mountain Railroad Heritage Society

Join Jim for a visual presentation on how to locate historic train stations, water tanks, pump houses and rolling stock in Colorado.

 

Colorado Genealogy Research

By Lori Collins, President of the Colorado Genealogical Society/Computer Interest Group

Come discover what resources Colorado has for working on your family tree and where you can get the information.

 

Colorado Inventors

By Doug Cohn, Director of Programming, Englewood Historical Society

Colorado is home to many inventors. Have you seen those message signs on trailers along the highways? Have you ever got ice from the hotel hallway ice machine? Ever wondered about oxygen concentrators? Have you seen the yellow flex pipe that goes down man holes so the guys can breathe? Ever wondered who invented the mounting device to hold the dash cam? Ever wonder who invented the seamless can to replace the soldered can? These and many more inventions will be talked about. All were invented by Coloradans.

 

The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla

By Tom Keller, Public speaker, historian, Tesla guru

Nikola Tesla is best known for his ground-breaking inventions/ contributions in the fields of electricity and physics which helped usher in the Second Industrial Revolution in the early 20th Century.  His patents and theoretical work formed the basis for modern Alternating Current electricity and many other achievements.

 

Exonerating General George Custer: Separating Fact from Political Bias

By George Koukeas, Freelance writer, public speaker

Who was the real George Custer? Having been demonized since the 1960’s by politically-motivated groups, Custer was a war hero who opposed slavery and became a whistleblower for reservation Indians.  The presentation will give an overview of Custer’s life, achievements, and character.  In the process, myths about the Indian wars and Custer’s involvement with them will be disproved.  The emphasis will be on 3 major missions in Custer’s military life.  This presentation will render an accurate picture of Custer that goes beyond “political correctness.”

 

What Really Happened to Titanic?

By Phill Kleppen & Janet Kalstrom, volunteers at Molly Brown House Museum

Who was the real George Custer? Having been demonized since the 1960’s by politically-motivated groups, Custer was a war hero who opposed slavery and became a whistleblower for reservation Indians.  The presentation will give an overview of Custer’s life, achievements, and character.  In the process, myths about the Indian wars and Custer’s involvement with them will be disproved.  The emphasis will be on 3 major missions in Custer’s military life.  This presentation will render an accurate picture of Custer that goes beyond “political correctness.”

 

Frontier Marshal, Mart Duggan, Ruled Rowdy Leadville with an Iron Fist

By Gail Lindley, Owner of Denver Bookbinding Company, member of Spellbinders

Marshal Mart Duggan is considered one of the most underrated gunmen of the Old West. Learn a little bit of Colorado history and how Leadville’s colorful past in the late 1800’s brought together familiar characters such as Frank and Jesse James, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday and more. Leadville was lawless in the late 1880’s and boasted of up to 50 thousand people in 1878. Mayor Horace Tabor approached the little blue eyed Irishman to take over as Marshal and bring law and order to rowdy Leadville.

 

Colorado’s Mining Booms & Busts: 150 Years of Roller Coaster History

By Stephen Hart, Retired geological engineer and part-time adjunct faculty at CSM

Who was the real George Custer? Having been demonized since the 1960’s by politically-motivated groups, Custer was a war hero who opposed slavery and became a whistleblower for reservation Indians.  The presentation will give an overview of Custer’s life, achievements, and character.  In the process, myths about the Indian wars and Custer’s involvement with them will be disproved.  The emphasis will be on 3 major missions in Custer’s military life.  This presentation will render an accurate picture of Custer that goes beyond “political correctness.”

 

November ’42, Watershed of the Century

By Stan Moore, historian, author, speaker

In late October 1942, WWII looked to be going badly for the Allies. The Axis were on the advance everywhere. But by December 2 they were everywhere stymied if not in retreat.

We will look at November 1942 through the lens of five campaigns around the world. Other social and economic issues and developments are brought in as well. After this critical month, the Axis would be marching backwards. Japanese and German forces never again regained the initiative.

The direction the war took in this month set the tone for the rest of the war and for the peace which most have enjoyed for over seventy years.

 

Who Was the Sculptor in Buckskin? Alexander Phimister Proctor!

By Dave Lively, Speaker and tour guide

Proctor was born in 1860 and then enjoyed a remarkable life after spending his youth in the Colorado wilderness. His larger than life sculptures can be seen in 26 public places across the nation including two in Denver’s Civic Center Plaza: The Buckaroo, and On the War Trail.

Although Proctor is recognized as the leader among American animal sculptors and as the country’s foremost creator of sculpted monuments on western themes, the more engaging aspects of his life are the development of his artistic talent, the remarkable characters he met by chance (or fortune), and his adventures with his wife and eight children as Proctor’s work took him all over the United States, France and Italy. He allowed himself time to go hunting with dignitaries such as Theodore Roosevelt, Gifford Pinchot and the Reverend Bayard Craig for whom the Town of Craig is named for.

 

Presenting

If you are interested in presenting and haven’t been to History Camp before, there are important ways in which being a part of History Camp is different than being a speaker at a conference.  It comes down to this: We’re all in this together, which means, among other things . . .

• Everyone comes at the beginning and stays until the end. Speakers do not just come for their session and leave.

• No one is paid. This is an all-volunteer effort designed to break even.

• You are your own A/V tech. Just arrive early if you are doing the first session so you have plenty of time to set up, and stay until the next person comes so you can help them.

• Everyone pays. There is no formal organization behind History Camp. Your payment, along with those from everyone else, means that the organizers don’t have to dig in to their own pockets to make up the shortfall.

• Everyone shares. If you have slides, we’ll help you post them to the History Camp site. We may also videotape or stream your presentation live (such as on Facebook) so that people who can’t attend can benefit from History Camp.

If History Camp sounds like its for you, please fill out this form. Browse prior years to read about other presentations as well as the different formats that have been used. If you have questions, please let me know.

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave